Monday, September 8, 2014

Rubbish Tuesday #19

"The Reuben Moore Home State Historic Site stands among the remnants of what is known as the Farmington settlement. It is about one mile north of Lincoln Log Cabin, the home of Abraham Lincoln's father and stepmother. In late 1856 Reuben Moore built the house and moved in with his wife, Matilda Hall (Abraham Lincoln's stepsister) and five children from their previous marriages. Matilda lived in the farm house for several years after Reuben's death in 1859. In January of 1861 Abraham Lincoln bid farewell to his stepmother, Sarah Bush Lincoln at the Moore home on his way to the White House. The Moore home features beautifuly restored interior, including stenciled walls, a grained manel, marbelized shelves, and lovely furniture pieces from the 1860s. The burial site of Thomas Lincoln and Sarah Bush Lincoln is located a mile west of the Moore Home in Shiloh Cemetery." ~ Wikipedia

Sadly, the house is rarely open to the public so I have never seen inside.





This is the front of the house. It once had a covered porch. You can see where it once was.


This is the back. It looks to be in better condition than the front, but the whole house is in dire need of a fresh coat of paint. Sadly, our State has cut spending.


This is a shed in the back. 


And, of course, the outhouse.


The lawn and trees are beautiful, but there are no flowers. As I mentioned, the State has cut funding, so there isn't money to maintain a garden.

Thanks for stopping by. I hope you will join in the fun.

My idea was to have a place to post 'old things'. Anything old
and/or deteriorating such as, but not limited to, old houses, barns, outbuildings, old cars, rusty things, antiques, interesting junk, or it can be something in pristine condition, but just old. 

1. Link to a post featuring photos of something old.
2. Link back to Rubbish by Roan in your post.
3. As time allows, visit other participants and comment on their posts.







32 comments:

Tom said...

Old trashy rubbish this week from me, just a treasured antique. Have a great week. Tom The Backroads Traveller

EG CameraGirl said...

Colourful outhouse! I bet the house was rather attractive when it had a porch.

Cranberry Morning said...

Wouldn't it be interesting to see the interior too. Thanks for this post. It prompts so many thoughts about people living at a different time and how much less demanding they were of material goods.

Buttons said...

I would love to go inside. It is always so much fun to see what came before us and imagine the life of those before. Hug B

Brian King said...

Wow! That's been around a long time! Too bad they don't maintain it on a more regular basis.

TexWisGirl said...

pretty neat old place! i like its simplicity. hope they will keep it going.

Dicky Bird said...

I love the colors - mustard and red - neat old place. Would like to see inside too.

Lisa @ Two Bears Farm said...

Great place! Is there anywhere left that hasn't cut funding?

Rose said...

I would love to see inside! Am almost amazed that it isn't broken into or vandalized in some way.

Lois said...

It makes me sad that this wonderful old place is just sitting there not getting any attention. I would love to see inside too!

ladyfi said...

What a charming house!

Stephanie said...

It is a charming looking house, love the outhouse.

Gail Dixon said...

Well, the grounds are really beautiful even without gardens. Thank you for sharing this wonderful, historic place with us! Hope you have a great week.

Ginny said...

Well, the state could get more money if they fix the place up a bit and open it for tours with a small fee. What a shame it just sits like this. It needs a purpose, don't you think?

Tanya Breese said...

i just love places like this!

Amy Burzese said...

Beautiful historic property. I hope you get to see inside some day soon.

Gerald (SK14) said...

looks like all it needs is a bit of tlc

bettyl-NZ said...

How great that they have made it an historic site. A coat of paint and I'd be tempted to move in...well, if it were farther south :)

Jennifer A. Jilks said...

I love it! You'd think some rich folks would pay for restoration... sigh.

Ann, Chen Jie Xue 陈洁雪 said...

good idea to preserve old buildings

bj said...

This is very interesting.
Thanks for hosting...:)

doodles n daydreams said...

What a wonderful piece of history and a shame there is no money to spend on upkeep.

Diana

Wandering Wren said...

Your log cabin is full of history, what a shame that there are not the funds for a bit of a refurbishment and to open to the public occasionally.
I can't decide whether I've added art or a load of old rubbish this week. Thank you for hosting.
Wren x

HOOTIN ANNI said...

Interesting!!! When I see historical markers I always have to stop and read. Love this area/post!!

georgettesullins said...

What interesting history. I didn't know Abraham Lincoln had step-siblings. It would be very nice to view the interior. Sad theme - "the state has cut funding." I wonder if it's on the list of National Trust for Historic Preservation.

McGuffy Ann Morris said...

I would love to visit more places like this! Thank you!

Halcyon said...

A little sad to see there isn't much upkeep anymore. I wonder if some group could "adopt" it like people adopt stretches of road to keep clean?
If you ever get inside, you'll definitely have to share those pictures!

Halcyon said...

A little sad to see there isn't much upkeep anymore. I wonder if some group could "adopt" it like people adopt stretches of road to keep clean?
If you ever get inside, you'll definitely have to share those pictures!

Halcyon said...

A little sad to see there isn't much upkeep anymore. I wonder if some group could "adopt" it like people adopt stretches of road to keep clean?
If you ever get inside, you'll definitely have to share those pictures!

Felicia said...

It's a beautiful historic sight. It's a shame its not better maintained.

Mama Zen said...

Hope they don't just let it fall down!

Marie said...

Oh, Roan, I love this! How I would adore taking my grandson here, because recently in doing research on his Dad's side of the family, I discovered that Thomas Lincoln (Abraham's father) was the brother of one of my grandson's ancestors. My Grandson's great great great grandfather was Abraham's first cousin. This branch of the family moved to Texas. My grandson couldn't believe it....he loves Abraham Lincoln!

Love this post! I hope they will try to preserve it better. It needs some attention, and would be an awful loss! Sorry I missed out this week. I think I have something for next week.